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hedgehog mushrooms are NOT chanterelles.

Whole Foods Makes Multiple Mushroom Mistakes!

I don’t shop at Whole Foods regularly, but my sister does. She texted me before Thanksgiving, excited to tell me she’d bought chanterelles for us to cook and share. Imagine my surprise to find that the mushrooms Whole Foods was selling as chanterelles were, in fact, nothing of the sort. Fortunately, they were another edible mushroom, so no danger of poisoning here, but still… Shouldn’t we expect more from a respected national retailer? (That’s a rhetorical question. The answer is yes.) Ah, but it gets worse. This wasn’t an isolated incident, and Whole Foods has chosen NOT to correct the problem.

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sunchoke purée

Sunchoke Purée: Recipe

If you’re a regular reader here, you know I’ve posted a lot of sunchoke recipes. I’ve spent hours in the kitchen playing with these tubers, using them every way I could imagine. This year I went for something simple, and I’ll be darned if it’s not my favorite recipe yet. At first I thought it was too obvious to post, but a recent email from a reader convinced me otherwise. (Thank you, Mohamad.) And so I give you sunchoke purée. May you enjoy it as long as your sunchokes last (which for me is usually until about March). Read more

Almond Joy cocktail, made with homemade noyaux

The Almond Joy: a Noyaux Cocktail

This was a killer year for stone fruit in Santa Fe, and I harvested loads of apricots, plums, nectarines, and peaches. After making jams, jellies, chutneys, salsas, and dried fruit, I was left with a big pile of pits, so I shoved them in the freezer, thinking there MUST be something I could do with them.

Did you know that almond extract is NOT made from almonds? It’s the apricot kernels inside the pits that give almond extract its flavor, so I decided to infuse some booze with my apricot kernels. Thus was born a new cocktail: The Almond Joy. It’s a spirit forward, slightly sweet adult beverage, named after one of my favorite candy bars.  Read more

chokecherry bounce

Chokecherry Bounce: a Rye Cocktail

What exactly is a bounce? Rumor has it that cherry bounce was one of George Washington’s favorite tipples, and Martha’s recipe for the beverage survives to this day. In this foraged version, I’ve substituted chokecherries for cultivated cherries, and rye for the more traditional brandy. And while many bounce recipes are heavily spiced with cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg, I’ve kept it simple with just three ingredients. Once you’ve made the base infusion, you can enjoy it any way you’d like: poured over a single large ice cube, sipped neat from a coupe, combined with a sploosh of seltzer, or garnished with a few Luxardo cherries. Any way you drink it, Chokecherry Bounce is an exceptional adult beverage. Read more

Queen Anne's Lace Tonic

Naturally Effervescent Queen Anne’s Lace Tonic

I never know what to call this kind of beverage. A cordial? A soda? To some people, the word cordial means a liqueur, but this drink is alcohol-free. And the word soda brings up mental images of two-liter bottles of Coke (at least to me!), so that’s not right either. This is an effervescent, naturally fermented, non-alcoholic beverage that will knock your socks off. So I’m calling it Queen Anne’s Lace Tonic, and here’s how you make it. Read more

black raspberry pudding cake

Black Raspberry Pudding Cake Recipe

The black raspberries are coming in strong! Crazy strong. So strong there’s no need to ration this delicious fruit. I can eat it every day if I want to, and still have plenty to dip into next winter when fresh foraged fruit isn’t a possibility. Which means I’m experimenting with a whole bunch of recipes, and this black raspberry pudding cake is number one on the runway. It’s not too sweet, very fruity, and has the consistency of a thick clafouti. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and in between…it’s low sugar, low fat, and comes together quickly and easily. Read more

Cattail Flowers

One of the first things every forager learns is that Euell Gibbons described cattails as “the supermarket of the swamp.”

It’s true, cattails have multiple, very tasty edible parts. (And they often grow in water, if not actual swamps.) I call the cattail an edible superstar, and of all its tasty parts, the immature male cattail flowers are my favorite. They’re easy to harvest and very versatile. Try eating cattail flowers in a simple preparation first, to get a feel for their flavor. Read more