HOME > foraging

Category: foraging

Queen Anne's Lace Tonic

Naturally Effervescent Queen Anne’s Lace Tonic

I never know what to call this kind of beverage. A cordial? A soda? To some people, the word cordial means a liqueur, but this drink is alcohol-free. And the word soda brings up mental images of two-liter bottles of Coke (at least to me!), so that’s not right either. This is an effervescent, naturally fermented, non-alcoholic beverage that will knock your socks off. So I’m calling it Queen Anne’s Lace Tonic, and here’s how you make it. Read more

black raspberry pudding cake

Black Raspberry Pudding Cake Recipe

The black raspberries are coming in strong! Crazy strong. So strong there’s no need to ration this delicious fruit. I can eat it every day if I want to, and still have plenty to dip into next winter when fresh foraged fruit isn’t a possibility. Which means I’m experimenting with a whole bunch of recipes, and this black raspberry pudding cake is number one on the runway. It’s not too sweet, very fruity, and has the consistency of a thick clafouti. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and in between…it’s low sugar, low fat, and comes together quickly and easily. Read more

Cattail Flowers

One of the first things every forager learns is that Euell Gibbons described cattails as “the supermarket of the swamp.”

It’s true, cattails have multiple, very tasty edible parts. (And they often grow in water, if not actual swamps.) I call the cattail an edible superstar, and of all its tasty parts, the immature male cattail flowers are my favorite. They’re easy to harvest and very versatile. Try eating cattail flowers in a simple preparation first, to get a feel for their flavor. Read more

cattail flower breakfast

Cattail Flower Breakfast: Recipe

I can’t REALLY call this a soufflé, but it’s pouffy and light and egg-based, so I consider it a pseudo-psoufflé. Cattail flowers have a brief season, and for this recipe you’ll need to catch the male flowers before they open. Look for long, slim cylinders near the tips of the cattail leaves. Those are the young flowers, and they’re divided into two parts: male flowers on top, female flowers on the bottom. The male flowers, before they ripen and produce pollen, are a lovely, naturally sweet vegetable, with a flavor vaguely reminiscent of corn. This cattail flower breakfast recipe is a great way to enjoy a fleeting, seasonal flavor. Read more

foraged spring rolls

Foraged Spring Rolls for Spring: Recipe

I love it when food looks fancy and difficult but is really super easy to make. Who doesn’t like to impress friends and family with delicious, gorgeous food that actually comes together in a flash? These foraged spring rolls can be made with whatever you find in your ‘hood, plus a few grocery store items. And while they’re called spring rolls, you could easily make a different version for each season. Let’s start with spring. Read more

Magnolia Blossom Cream Cake

Magnolia Blossom Cream Cake: Recipe

Magnolias are glorious. Period. When they’re in bloom, they punctuate the landscape with gigantic bursts of color and fragrance, and some of these flowers are quite wonderfully delicious. This past weekend was a magnolia bonanza, and there will be LOTS OF recipes coming your way. But the very first (and yes, my favorite) is this Magnolia Blossom Cream Cake. It’s a surprisingly simple recipe with a unique flavor that no one will be able to guess without a clue from the cook. Read more

dock and yogurt dip

Dock and Yogurt Dip (It’s like a Foraged Tzadziki)

In case you didn’t know it, I’m Greek. Well, half Greek. The half of me that cooks is Greek.

My point is that I love Greek food, and tonight I’ll be serving a foraged version of tzadziki at my monthly girls’ night dinner. Traditional tzadziki is made from cucumbers, garlic, and yogurt, but this foraged version substitutes curly dock leaves for cucumbers. The tart flavor and crunchy texture of the dock leaves combined with creamy, thick yogurt make an excellent dip. Read more